What farmers see….

There are some magical parts of the growing season that only the farmer gets to see – I’ve been saving this picture since January – Jenny Indian sent it in from her farm in Stanley because she wanted to share the amazing sight of her chestnut trees in full flower.

Jenny says if you look closely under the weird flowing tassels you will find tiny translucent spiky chestnut cases forming. The cases have matured now and the prickly chestnut harvest is well under way – yes, Jenny uses gloves but the spines still find their way into her chestnut picking fingers.  Like Shane O’Dea’s fresh pistachios, Jenny’s chestnuts are a month later than usual this year due to the cold start to summer though just in time for the start of the cool weather.

You can find chestnuts here as well as Jenny’s quinces.

Like to feel closer to your nettles?

Through winter stinging nettles are a constant in Joe’s Market Garden; on cold, damp mornings they somehow find a way around your gloves to sting tender wrists.  Garden mentor, Joe Garita, who seemed immune to nettle stings, used to pick nettles to make a hair tonic. And I’ve got to say for 80+ year old hair it did appear quite soft and full of body.

Living herbal treasure, Isabell Shipard calls nettles nature’s pharmacy.  Nettles are one of the richest sources of chlorophyll, are high in iron, iodine, calcium, magnesium, vitamins A, B complex, C, D, E, K and even serotonin.  Shipard writes lovingly of the nettle’s long medicinal history – including bizarre methods of administering its potent payload – anyone for a nettle switch on a stiff joint or rolling nude in a nettle patch?

If you would like get to know nettles better then get down to Joe’s Market Garden in Coburg this coming Saturday the 29th where Monique Miller will be sharing her secrets of the stinging nettle.  Here’s the workshop link  (places limited).

Have a great week

Chris

BTW – ANZAC Day Tuesday deliveries will be happening as normal this week.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *